Black History Month

February is Black History Month; during which we celebrate the contributions, prosperity, and progress of African American achievements. Therefore, we are taking time to reflect on the pivotal roles made by Black Americans in our country.

Highlighting the black community’s contributions in Howard County:

Reverend John W. Holland: Born on Feb. 3, 1910, in Cooksville, Reverend Holland was a lifelong resident of Howard County. Through his ministry and civic leadership, he was a force in shaping the quality of life in the county. For more information see following link: https://cac-hc.org/holland-awards/

Dr. Morris Woodson: In 1947 Dr. Woodson first worked at the old Cooksville High School as a Social Studies and PE teacher.  In 1950 he was hired as Supervisor of Black Elementary Schools (Highland, MD, Elkridge, MD and Ellicott City, MD). In 1954 he was asked to open Guilford Elementary School (all black school). In 1965 he became the first black supervisor of all Elementary Schools in Howard County, later the title was changed to Director of Elementary Schools. Dr. Woodson retired in 1977.  However, he still worked part-time to examine and grade essays when new teacher applicants applied for teaching jobs.Dr. Woodson’s accomplishments include First Black HCPSS Supervisor (fulltime), Elementary and High Schools, as Supervisor of Integrated Schools, Assistant Director & Director, Elementary Schools, and Supervisor, Pupil Personnel for Black schools.For more information see following link for Washington Post article: https://tinyurl.com/bw4ab262 Also see link for Baltimore Sun article: https://tinyurl.com/52v4vw6j

Mr. Silas Craft: Came to Howard County in 1944 as principal of the segregated Cooksville High School. In 1949, he helped open the bigger Harriet Tubman High School for blacks. As Tubman's principal and president of the Howard County branch of the NAACP, he was strict with his students and forceful with white officials.For more information see following link: https://tinyurl.com/fnzj85fu

Walt Carr: Mr.Carr is 88 years old and lives in Columbia. He has been drawing cartoons for about 50 years.He is Self-taught, he worked at the Social Security Administration as an illustrator in their art department. He has been a contributor to Ebony magazine, “Strictly for Laughs.” For more information see following link: https://tinyurl.com/ycxtfzk3

Terri Hill M.D,State Delegate(WLHS graduate):Dr.Hill, was born in Pennsylvania, later moved to Howard County, and attended Wilde Lake High School, is a plastic surgeon, member of Maryland House of Delegates since January 14, 2015. For more information see following link:https://tinyurl.com/2p987ejh

 

Donna Hill-Staton: Donna Hill Staton wanted to be a lawyer since age 12. Not only did she succeed in this goal, but in 1995 she made history by becoming the first African American judge in Howard County, winning appointment to the Howard County Circuit Court. Ms. Hill-Staton is also a Wilde Lake High School graduate and is the sister of Terri Hill.For more information see following link: https://tinyurl.com/y9s6yhjc

Week 2:

February is Black History Month; during which we celebrate the contributions, prosperity, and progress of African American achievements. Therefore, we are taking time to reflect on the pivotal roles made by Black Americans in our country.

 

Visit the National Museum of African American History and Culture and visit the “Black History Month page” at https://tinyurl.com/yckkmnd3

 

Knowing the past opens doors to the future, the continuing importance of Black History Month. For more information see following link: https://tinyurl.com/u5vvsu9e

Week 3:

February is Black History Month; during which we celebrate the contributions, prosperity, and progress of African American achievements. Therefore, we are taking time to reflect on the pivotal roles made by Black Americans in our country.

 

Visit the National Museum of African American History and Culture and visit the “Black History Month page” at https://tinyurl.com/yckkmnd3

 

Knowing the past opens doors to the future, the continuing importance of Black History Month. For more information see following link: https://tinyurl.com/u5vvsu9e